Supporting the teaching of the legacies of slavery

This is a slightly unusual blog in that I am not sharing my own thoughts but rather celebrating the work of my colleagues from UoN History and seeking to point people towards a valuable new teaching resource developed for use by teachers and schools wanting to teach the history of enslavement and race more effectively.

The ‘Nottingham’s Legacies of Slavery’ Project

The ‘Nottingham’s Legacies of Slavery’ project resources have been developed by Dr James Dawkins, Dr Susan Kilby and Dr Cassandra Gooptar of the University of Nottingham in collaboration with Nottingham City Council.  They contain resources to support both primary and secondary educators in history teaching and other subject areas – certainly English, RE, Geography, Sociology and PSHCE teachers involved in piloting the materials have indicated how valuable the resources could be in supporting their curriculum. 

The Glossary of Terminology for Understanding Slavery and ‘Race’ is a more universally applicable resource (not bound by locality) and has been successfully used by schools for a range of purpose, including to facilitate whole school conversations around how to approach supporting young people’s understanding of race and diversity in school settings.  

You can access the suite of digital resources via the following link.

If you scroll down, you’ll see icons for each of the individual resources on the right-hand-side of the page. Click on any one of these and scroll down to the bottom of the material’s page to access the resource download link.

Below are links to each individual teaching material’s web page:

  1. Glossary of Terminology for Understanding Slavery and ‘Race’  
  2. Leaders in the Community: George Africanus
  3. Leaders in the Community: Eric Irons  
  4. Activity Pack: Nottingham Monopoly
  5. Nottingham’s Links to Slavery in Jamaica: Robert Smith, Lord Carrington  

We hope that they will prove useful for colleagues seeking to improve student understanding of this complex and important history. 

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